Regulating Madness: GMAT Critical Reasoning

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Regulating Madness: GMAT Critical Reasoning

GMAT question of the day: Critical Reasoning
Explanation
When we read the question, since the prompt is lengthy and chunky-looking, we might drift down to the question stem. Laziness can be a force for good. From the question stem, we see this question has a touch of complexity: there is a plan, and there is a problem with the plan, and we're asked for a solution. The stem also pretty much tells us what the plan is.

Creating the prediction: We go read the prompt, looking for more about the plan and the identification of the problem. The problem starts with the word "but": there is a long incubation period, and furthermore we sell beef without testing it. Two solutions that spring to mind involve having a time machine or testing the beef. Testing the beef is probably too obvious, but it's better than the time machine, so we'll take that and go to the answer choices.

Testing this prediction, (A) doesn't match our prediction. (B) is related to testing. (C) is a new form of testing that sounds promising. (D) is actually similar to our prediction. (E) is not about testing, but seems logical. We can try to make our prediction more specific. The right answer must relate definitively to the plan and overcoming the problem with the plan. The plan is to "reassure consumers" that controls are in place. We realize that (C), (D), and (E) could all happen without consumers having any idea that the measures had been taken. (B) is the only one that reassures consumers at all, regardless of the fact it's a less complete solution to BSE.

The correct answer is (B).

Don’t let this GMAT question of the day get in your brain!